Emerald Okra Seed

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Market price: $3.99
Our price: $2.29
SKU162101
SKU1621012
SKU162103
SKU16210123

Quantity 239 item(s) available
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Emerald Okra (56 days)

Introduced by Campbell's Soup

If I remember correctly this was a Cajun cook's dream.  My granny hailed from the great state of Louisiana and many a time I remember smelling fried okra wafting from the kitchen during a fish fry.  You can easily fill a gumbo pot with the abundant pods from Emerald okra.  This okra is an early variety that you CAN actually let grow out past 3" to about 8".  At this size it will still be tender enough for gumbos or soups.  I'm not sure how convinced I am that it would be tasty for fried okra at that size, but many say it is.  Try it and see for yourself. 

Granny always picked 3-4" okra to cut up, be dipped in corn meal and fried to perfection in the cast iron skillet I now have.  Boy if that skillet could talk.  I know its been passed down at least three generations.  Nothing like fresh, out of your garden okra fried up in a cast iron skillet.  Man, I'm hungry now!

You guessed it!  If Campbell's thought is was good enough for a soup can you will be able to do magic with Emerald okra in your own kitchen.  This is a perfect canning variety. 

Recommended by the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.  "These seed varieties have been tested and proven resilient in the Florida backyard garden."



The Texas Cooperative Extension at Texas A&M recommends this variety for Texas!


seedFor those of you in the South where I come from you will have no problem growing okra, but if like me you now find yourself in an area with cool summers like the Pacific Northwest growing okra can be a tricky business.  Try starting it in a greenhouse and transplanting into the garden about May.  At best you'll get a taste of okra for a few weeks on stunted 2' plants depending on your micro climate.  To improve your okra plants you need to improve the heat units.  To do that try planting next to heat sinks like houses, brick/rock walls or anything that will absorb and radiate heat.   Good luck and send me your success stories!

Other Varieties:  Some of the many heirloom Okra varieties are:  Cow Horn heirloom okra, Louisiana Green Velvet heirloom okra, Red Okra heirloom okra, Star of David heirloom okra, Clemson Spineless heirloom okra, Emerald heirloom okra, Burgundy heirloom okra, White Velvet heirloom okra, Bowling red heirloom okra, Burmese heirloom okra, Fife Creek heirloom okra, Grandfather Kurtz heirloom okra, Harlow,s Homestead heirloom okra, Hill Country Red heirloom okra, Jimmy T heirloom okra, Jing Orange heirloom okra, Louisiana 16" long pod heirloom okra, Milsap White heirloom okra, Perkins long pod heirloom okra, Roberie heirloom okra and Dwarf Green Long Pod heirloom okra.   

 

Seed Planting Depth

Seeds per gram

Germination Temperature

Days to Germination

Row Spacing

Plant Spacing

100' Row Yield

Sun

1/4" 15-18 70-80 10-15 36" 12" 50-100 lb. Full

Abelmoschus esculentus

Planting Tips:

A hot weather plant, start indoors 2-3 weeks before last frost date.  Soak seeds overnight before planting.  Transplant into the garden a month after last frost date.  A heavy feeder, make sure to plant in fertile soil. 

  • Okra is from Africa.  Okra loves heat.  Days must be over 80F to produce decent crops.  The soil must be over 70F.  If you have cool summers wait to plant Okra at the end of May or 1st week in June.  Plant next heat sinks like rock walls or south sides of structures.  Try placing a few bricks or rocks at the base of established plants a heat sinks.
  • Once established Okra is very drought tolerant.  However, watering every 7-10 will produce higher yields. However don't over water.  Okra does like drier soils than most of your veggies. 
  • Ovoid planting Okra in wet, soggy soils.
  • Okra will grow best in soil that has been worked down to a level of 10".
  • Thin plants to about a 12" apart.
  • Fertilize your bed with composted manure before hand, but do not feed too much nitrogen was established.  This will cause luxuriant growth and few blooms/pods.

Seeding Rate:

75-90,000 plants/acre, aproximately 11-15 lb.

Heirloom seeds are hardy but always take care with your garden seeds to give them the appropriate amount of moisture - not letting the vegetable seeds dry out prematurely or overwatering and possibly having them rot.

 

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